The addiction to video games will be recognized as a disease by the WHO

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Among the other symptoms listed are “the continuation and increase of the activity of the game despite the emergence of negative consequences”.

The “trouble of the video game” (gaming disorder) is going to be recognized soon as a disease by the world Health Organization (WHO), announced on Friday in Geneva, a spokesman for the UN agency.

 

The risk of dependency associated with this “disorder” will be added to the 11th list of the international Classification of diseases (ICD), which will be published in June, said Tarik Jasarevic, at a press.

 

This list, compiled by the WHO, is based on the conclusions of health experts in the world.

 

The common definition of this “disorder of the video game” is “a behavior linked to video games on the internet or off-line, which is characterized by a loss of control over the game, a growing priority given to the game compared to other activities, to the point that it takes precedence over other interests,” said Mr. Jasarevic.

 

Other symptoms can include ” the continuation and increase in the activity of gambling despite the occurrence of negative consequences “.

 

According to WHO experts, a person must show attention abnormal in the game for at least a year before being diagnosed as suffering from this disorder, which will be classified as “addictive behavior,” added the spokesperson.

 

But he stressed that it was premature to speculate on the magnitude of the problem.

 

“The condition of the video game is a relatively new concept and epidemiological data in the population have not yet been collected,” he said.

 

Despite the lack of statistics, “the health experts are in agreement that there is a problem” and that its next inclusion in the ICD is a step that is correct, ” said Mr. Jasarevic.

 

“There are people who call for help,” he continued, noting that the formal recognition of their condition will help to trigger new research and new resources to combat this problem.

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